If you’re a fan of ‘Making A Murderer’ and want to delve into the roots of detective novels, Charles Felix’s ‘The Notting Hill Mystery’ is a must-read. This novel, a seminal work in the detective genre, provides important insight into the beginnings of crime fiction and parallels with our modern criminal justice system. This reading list on our broken criminal justice system is essential for those seeking a deeper understanding of the themes explored in ‘Making A Murderer’. Read on for a critical examination of ‘The Notting Hill Mystery’ and its relevance today.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Notting Hill Mystery Charles Felix, AKA Charles Warren Adams 1862/65 The novel, one of the first full-length detective novels, explores themes of justice, investigations and criminality that align with the issues raised in ‘Making A Murderer’. Its examination of an insurance inspector delving into the mystery of Lady Audley’s death offers a historical perspective on crime-solving methods.

Delving into the Moonstone by Wilkie Collins (1868)

As part of the ‘Making A Murderer’ reading list on our broken criminal justice system, Wilkie Collins’ ‘The Moonstone’ is another classic that offers profound insights.

Often considered one of the earliest detective novels in English literature, ‘The Moonstone’ is a tale of a stolen diamond and the unraveling of its mystery.

The novel’s innovative use of multiple narrators and intricate plot structure revolutionized the genre and set the stage for modern crime fiction.

The story’s focus on the detective Sergeant Cuff’s systematic approach to solving the mystery, his attention to detail, and his reliance on evidence over superstition or prejudice, mirrors issues tackled in ‘Making A Murderer’.

It underscores the importance of fair and thorough investigations, a cornerstone of any just criminal justice system, making it a crucial addition to this reading list.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Moonstone Wilkie Collins 1868 ‘The Moonstone’ is a pioneering detective novel that emphasizes the importance of thorough investigation and evidence-based reasoning. These themes resonate with ‘Making A Murderer’, which critically examines the criminal justice system and the importance of fair investigations.
Making A Murderer A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System

Exploring the Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle (1901/2)

Our exploration of ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ would be incomplete without delving into Arthur Conan Doyle’s masterpiece, ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’.

Published in 1901/2, this captivating classic introduces Sherlock Holmes and his loyal companion, Dr. John Watson, as they navigate through a labyrinth of eerie encounters and cryptic clues on the gloomy moorlands of Devonshire.

The story’s fascinating blend of Gothic, mystery, and adventure genres sets it apart from typical crime novels and provides a rich context for understanding the evolution of detective fiction.

Doyle’s meticulous characterisation of Holmes, with his logical reasoning and scientific methods of investigation, forms a striking contrast to the sensationalised and often flawed portrayal of law enforcement in ‘Making A Murderer’.

‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ offers readers a chance to reflect on the crucial role of fair and unbiased investigations in the pursuit of justice. Exploring this classic work deepens our understanding of the fundamental principles that should guide criminal investigations, providing a historical framework to the issues raised in ‘Making A Murderer’.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Hound of the Baskervilles Arthur Conan Doyle 1901/2 ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ showcases Sherlock Holmes’ unbiased and scientific approach to criminal investigations, providing a stark contrast to the flawed investigations depicted in ‘Making A Murderer’. This contrast helps us understand the importance of fair and accurate detective work in the criminal justice system.

Understanding the Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie (1920)

Continuing our exploration of ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’, we delve into Agatha Christie’s first published novel, ‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’. Published in 1920, this classic introduces the world to the legendary detective, Hercule Poirot, and his distinctive methods of investigation.

Set against the backdrop of an English country house, Poirot unravels the murder of Emily Inglethorp, highlighting the quintessential country house murder mystery trope so often seen in British detective fiction.

Christie’s novel provides an insightful look into the meticulous and logical approach of Poirot, a stark contrast to the flawed investigation methods presented in ‘Making A Murderer’.

‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’ underscores the importance of a thorough and impartial investigation, a theme that resonates strongly with ‘Making A Murderer’.

As we delve into this classic, we gain a deeper understanding of the principles that should underpin any criminal investigation, further highlighting the issues raised in ‘Making A Murderer’.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Mysterious Affair at Styles Agatha Christie 1920 ‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’ introduces Hercule Poirot’s methodical and unbiased approach to crime solving, emphasizing the importance of a thorough and impartial investigation. These themes resonate with ‘Making A Murderer’, which critically examines the flaws in criminal investigations.

With each novel we delve into, we uncover more layers of the complex issues surrounding our criminal justice system.

Decoding the Crime at Black Dudley by Margery Allingham (1929)

As we further delve into our intriguing series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’, we turn our attention to Margery Allingham’s 1929 classic, ‘The Crime at Black Dudley’. This gripping novel marks the debut of the enigmatic detective, Albert Campion, and is set within the ominous confines of the isolated Black Dudley mansion.

A weekend gathering quickly spirals into a dangerous game of survival as the guests become entangled in a sinister plot revolving around a stolen artifact known as the “Dudley Death Stone”. Allingham’s novel, much like ‘Making A Murderer’, challenges us to question the integrity of those in positions of power and the lengths they will go to preserve their secrets.

‘The Crime at Black Dudley’ shines a spotlight on the importance of resilience, courage, and the pursuit of truth, even when faced with terrifying odds. This classic British mystery novel, with its intricate plot and thrilling suspense, offers a rich tapestry for exploring the themes of justice, power, and corruption that are so vividly portrayed in ‘Making A Murderer’.

Investigating the Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley (1929)

Our exploration of ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ continues with the ‘Poisoned Chocolates Case’ by Anthony Berkeley. Published in 1929, this novel adds a unique twist to the detective genre. A box of poisoned chocolates sent to a known womaniser results in his wife’s death. The novel features six amateur detectives, each with their own distinct methods, tasked with solving the case.

This novel shares some common themes with ‘Making A Murderer’. It showcases a crime scene open to interpretation and investigation from various perspectives. The story emphasizes the importance of different angles and approaches in solving crimes. It also highlights the potential for bias and errors in criminal investigations.

The novel’s focus is on the process of deduction and the importance of evidence-based conclusions. This is in stark contrast to the questionable investigation methods highlighted in ‘Making A Murderer’.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Poisoned Chocolates Case Anthony Berkeley 1929 ‘The Poisoned Chocolates Case’ emphasizes the importance of multiple perspectives and evidence-based conclusions in crime-solving. This mirrors the concerns over biased investigations presented in ‘Making A Murderer’.

We will continue to unravel the intricate connections between these classic British mysteries and the flawed criminal justice system portrayed in ‘Making A Murderer’. The next book on our list is a chilling tale of murder and deception by Dorothy L. Sayers.

Making A Murderer A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System

Unpacking Malice Aforethought by Frances Iles (1931)

As we continue with our series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’, we delve into the narrative of Frances Iles’ 1931 novel, ‘Malice Aforethought’. This tale is unique in the crime genre as it reveals the culprit from the start.

The story is a gripping exploration of a murderer’s psyche, a respected doctor planning to kill his wife. It presents a disturbing portrait of cold, calculated malice.

The novel’s focus on a criminal mind’s thought processes and motivations draws a parallel to the narrative of ‘Making A Murderer’. The audience is confronted with the question of whether justice is being served or manipulated by those with hidden agendas.

Iles’ exploration of manipulation, especially by those in positions of trust and power, resonates powerfully with ‘Making A Murderer’s’ underlying themes. We will continue to explore more intriguing connections in our series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’.

Solving the Nine Tailors by Dorothy L. Sayers (1934)

As we move forward in our series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’, we turn our attention to another classic British mystery, ‘The Nine Tailors’ by Dorothy L. Sayers.
Published in 1934, this novel features the beloved detective Lord Peter Wimsey.
This time, he finds himself embroiled in a complex scenario involving stolen jewels, a mysterious corpse, and the ancient art of bell-ringing in a rural English community.

The novel stands out for its meticulous attention to detail and its intricate plotting, much like the investigative scrutiny portrayed in ‘Making A Murderer’.
Sayers tactfully uses the seemingly innocuous act of bell-ringing as a critical clue, demonstrating that no detail is too small in a criminal investigation.
‘The Nine Tailors’ also echoes the themes of societal pressure and the power of community influence, much like the Manitowoc County community’s role in ‘Making A Murderer’.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Nine Tailors Dorothy L. Sayers 1934 ‘The Nine Tailors’ underscores the importance of careful examination of details in criminal investigations, a theme that resonates with the investigative process showcased in ‘Making A Murderer’.
It also highlights the influence of community in shaping perceptions of guilt and innocence.

Analyzing And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (1939)

The next stop in our enthralling series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’, takes us to the shores of the fictional Soldier Island in Agatha Christie’s masterful mystery, ‘And Then There Were None’. First published in 1939, this novel grips readers with its innovative narrative structure where ten strangers are lured to a secluded island, only to be picked off one by one in accordance with a haunting nursery rhyme.

The mounting tension and the baffling mystery make this novel a must-read in understanding the progression of the crime genre.

What makes ‘And Then There Were None’ particularly relevant to ‘Making A Murderer’ is the manner in which guilt and innocence become increasingly blurred as the story progresses. As with the controversial trials in ‘Making A Murderer’, Christie’s novel also explores the terrifying repercussions of a flawed justice system.

Here’s a brief analysis of this connection:

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
And Then There Were None Agatha Christie 1939 Serving justice and detecting guilt is the underlying theme in ‘And Then There Were None’, much like in ‘Making A Murderer’. The story compels us to question the integrity of the justice system, where presumptions of guilt often overshadow the pursuit of truth.

As we dive deeper into Agatha Christie’s chilling narrative, it becomes evident that ‘And Then There Were None’ shares the same unsettling undercurrents as ‘Making A Murderer’. Both chillingly remind us of the human fallibility in justice systems, making us question whether justice is truly served or manipulated.

10. Unveiling the Moving Toyshop by Edmund Crispin (1946)

The tenth recommendation in our series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ is ‘The Moving Toyshop’ by Edmund Crispin.

Published in 1946, this novel stands out with its unique blend of humour and intellectual sleuthing, featuring Oxford don turned detective, Gervase Fen.

With a plot revolving around a toyshop that mysteriously vanishes after a murder occurs inside it, this novel is a sublime mixture of suspense, comedy, and eccentricity.

The relevance of ‘The Moving Toyshop’ to ‘Making A Murderer’ lies in its exploration of the malleability of truth.

Just as Crispin’s toyshop vanishes, leading to a quest for truth that is both literal and metaphorical, the truth in ‘Making A Murderer’ is elusive, manipulated by powerful forces within the criminal justice system.

Book Author Year of Publication Relevance to ‘Making A Murderer’
The Moving Toyshop Edmund Crispin 1946 The elusive toyshop in Crispin’s novel symbolises the elusive truth in ‘Making A Murderer’. Both narratives challenge us to question the reliability of evidence and the objectivity of those who interpret it.

As we turn the pages of ‘The Moving Toyshop’, we are reminded that truth and justice are often more complex than they appear.

This serves as a poignant parallel to the themes explored in ‘Making A Murderer’.

Making A Murderer A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System

1Appreciating To Love & Be Wise by Josephine Tey (1950)

The eleventh recommendation in our deep-dive series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ is Josephine Tey’s ‘To Love & Be Wise’. Published in 1950, this riveting mystery captivates readers with its intriguing plot and the sharp wit of its protagonist, Inspector Alan Grant. The story unfolds around the disappearance of a charming young man during a party, leading Grant on a treacherous journey of deception, jealousy, and hidden truths.

What makes ‘To Love & Be Wise’ an essential inclusion in our reading list is its exploration of the fallibility of evidence and its impact on the quest for justice. This theme is reminiscent of ‘Making A Murderer’. As Tey’s narrative unfolds, we are forced to confront the reality that evidence can be manipulated and truth can be obfuscated.

This theme intersects with the narrative of ‘Making A Murderer’, where the integrity of evidence and the sanctity of truth are persistently questioned. As you delve into this mesmerizing mystery, you’ll find yourself drawing parallels between the fictional world of Inspector Grant and the real-life controversies unraveled in ‘Making A Murderer’.

1Revealing An English Murder by Cyril Hare (1951)

The twelfth book in our list, ‘Revealing An English Murder’ by Cyril Hare, exposes us to the intricate web of British society and justice system of the 1950s. Published in 1951, this story masterfully combines the traditional elements of a murder mystery with larger societal critique.

Here, Hare crafts a plot centered around a murder that happens during a traditional English weekend gathering – the quintessential setting of a classic British mystery – making the narrative as rich in ambiance as it is in suspense.

‘Revealing An English Murder’ is not just a mystery novel; it is a reflection on the societal norms and the criminal justice system of its time. As part of our ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ series, this book sheds light on the bias, prejudices, and manipulation that can pervade a seemingly perfect justice system.

Much like in ‘Making A Murderer’, Hare’s narrative forces us to question the integrity of the system and those who hold power within it. This book underscores the idea that appearances can be deceiving, and justice can sometimes hang by the thread of human fallibility.

Moving on, let’s delve deeper into the realm of classic British crime fiction. Stay with us as we unfold the next masterpiece in our ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ series.

1Exploring Cover Her Face by PD James (1962)

“Exploring Cover Her Face” is the thrilling introduction to PD James’s Adam Dalgliesh series. Published in 1962, it revolves around the murder of a newly hired maid during a village fête in an English manor.

This British classic not only offers a complex whodunit for readers to unravel, but also provides a sharp critique of post-war English society. James plays on the classic trope of the isolated country house murder and brilliantly combines it with nuances of class prejudice and discrimination, making this mystery novel a thought-provoking read.

“Exploring Cover Her Face” is an indispensable addition to our series, “Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System”. As PD James crafts an intimate portrait of Dalgliesh’s investigation, we are manipulated into questioning not only the credibility of the suspects but also the fairness of the justice system.

Much like “Making A Murderer”, James’s narrative raises uneasy questions about the reliability of circumstantial evidence and forensics, and scrutinises the bias, stereotypes and societal attitudes that can distort the path to justice.

As you immerse yourself in this nail-biting narrative, you’ll find chilling echoes with the true-crime revelations of “Making A Murderer” and might wonder if justice truly prevails when it’s left in the hands of fallible human beings.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Which British mystery novel should I start with?

If you’re new to the genre and are following our ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ series, starting with Agatha Christie’s “The Mysterious Affair at Styles” is an excellent choice. This novel not only introduces one of the most iconic detectives, Hercule Poirot, but also offers a classic country house murder mystery that will keep you guessing till the end.

Moreover, Christie’s exploration of the justice system’s intricacies aligns perfectly with the themes of our series, providing a captivating starting point for your journey into British mystery novels.

Who are some of the best British mystery writers?

Some of the best British mystery writers include Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, and John le Carré, all of whom have significantly influenced the genre. Their works, such as Christie’s “The Mysterious Affair at Styles,” Doyle’s “The Hound of the Baskervilles,” and le Carré’s “Smiley’s People,” offer intriguing insights into the British criminal justice system, aligning perfectly with the themes of our series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’. These authors brilliantly combine suspenseful storytelling with a critical exploration of the justice system, making their novels not only entertaining but also thought-provoking.

What are the most popular British mystery novels of all time?

Some of the most popular British mystery novels of all time include Agatha Christie’s “The Mysterious Affair at Styles,” Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Hound of the Baskervilles,” and John le Carré’s “Smiley’s People.” These books not only captivate readers with their suspenseful plots but also offer an insight into the intricacies of the British criminal justice system.

This makes them an excellent addition to the reading list for those following the ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’ series. Each novel presents a unique take on the genre, pushing the boundaries of mystery storytelling while engaging with critical themes of justice and crime.

How has the British mystery genre evolved over the years?

The British mystery genre has vastly evolved over the years, reflecting changes in societal attitudes and legal systems. Originating from classic whodunits crafted by the likes of Agatha Christie and Arthur Conan Doyle, the genre has branched out to incorporate spy novels, legal thrillers, and psychological suspense.

The complexity of the genre mirrors the intricacies of the British criminal justice system, as beautifully illustrated in the series ‘Making A Murderer: A Reading List On Our Broken Criminal Justice System’.

Today’s British mystery novels not only offer thrilling narratives, but they also explore the nuances of crime and punishment, providing readers with thought-provoking commentary on justice and society.

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